Are all man’s inventions doomed to fail?

Discussion in 'Free Thoughts' started by Beaconator, Nov 2, 2022.

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  1. Jeeves Valued Senior Member

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    Some examples of each invention, poorly made or improperly used implements, old models, worn materials, often fail.
    Some inventions do not perform according the inventor's intention.
    Most inventions do not fail.
    However, nearly all of them, including shoes and spoons, can and will be put to some nefarious purpose.
     
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  3. Beaconator Valued Senior Member

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    If one invention could be so highly evolved that it performs all the inventors intentions and last forever is it then still man’s invention?
     
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  5. Beaconator Valued Senior Member

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    Nature
    Galaxies
    Elements
    Particles

    have longer longevity than man’s inventions. Is that idea not worth searching for?
     
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  7. Jeeves Valued Senior Member

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    Inventors don't usually have infinite intentions. They make a gizmo that's designed to perform one particular function. If the gizmo started 'evolving' - becoming something else, or reproducing itself, we would probably destroy it before it got smart and big enough to destroy us. So, chances are, we'll never know: the machines won't evolve or we won't be around. Besides, if some thing lasted even a dozen generations, who'd remember the inventor or his intention?
     
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  8. James R Just this guy, you know? Staff Member

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    Which idea?
     
  9. billvon Valued Senior Member

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    ?? The definition of a word explains its definition. For example, the term "invention" means "something, typically a process or device, that has been invented." Failure means "the omission of expected or required action." So if you invent a new battery, and it is expected to work for a year, and it does in fact work for a year, it is a successful invention.

    An invention does not have to be useful, long lived or rugged to be successful. For example, fireworks were certainly an invention - but last only seconds. And they are rarely useful for anything other than making people go "oooh aaaah."

    Nor does an invention describe how durable it is. You could get a patent for a specific cure for cancer, and it would an amazing and useful invention indeed. Even if the preparation required lasted only minutes before degrading.
    Nor is it the fault of the inventor.
    Fireworks were a successful invention.
    Nope. Again, fireworks.
    No. You may believe that, but that's not reality.
     
  10. sideshowbob Sorry, wrong number. Valued Senior Member

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    Nor does it have anything to do with failure. Success is a measure of what it does BEFORE it breaks. Torpedoes come to mind.
     
  11. Beaconator Valued Senior Member

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    Like the first inventor of shoes! Nobody has his name… might not even have had a name.
     
  12. Beaconator Valued Senior Member

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    Fireworks like torpedos typically last until they are used. So they are in fact built to be durable…

    your definition of invention doesn’t define the process of invention, in fact it relates itself to the same root word.

    if the inventor purposely makes inventions that break. I’m sorry but that is his fault. But it’s a free market and you can sell what you like.
     
  13. Beaconator Valued Senior Member

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    Smartest man in the room! Straight to the point. An idea you can’t be told it has to be thought. That is the true meaning of invention.
     
  14. billvon Valued Senior Member

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    OK. So if they last as long as they are designed to last, you consider them durable.

    In that case, almost all inventions are durable. The FLASH memory in phones, for example, is only made to last 10-100K read/write cycles. If it lasts that long, they are in fact durable by your definition.
    Right, because you haven't talked about the process, just about the result (i.e. they are all doomed.)
    Like fireworks or crash barriers or fire sprinklers? Yes, that is his "fault" - and is a reason his invention is successful.
     
  15. billvon Valued Senior Member

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    So nothing that is patented can be an invention? What a silly claim.
     
  16. Beaconator Valued Senior Member

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    Err no… I don’t know where you got that whole idea from but it is certainly not what I’m thinking.

    for example the shortest an object made of every element would last 42 minutes, because francium lasts only that amount of time. But the invention itself would last much longer without it.
     
    Last edited: Nov 8, 2022
  17. billvon Valued Senior Member

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    If "the true meaning of invention" is that it has to be thought, not told, then patents (the telling of an idea) are not inventions.
    ?? Copernicium has a half life of 10 seconds. Livermorium (a metal) has a half life of 18 milliseconds. And that's just the elements that have been discovered so far.

    However, it would also be silly to claim that inventions based on these elements are not really inventions, or are poor inventions. For example, the invention of radioactive tracers for radiology was a momentous invention indeed - but a common tracer (technetium-99m) not only does not exist in nature, it has a half life of 6 hours.
     
  18. James R Just this guy, you know? Staff Member

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    And, with this last piece of false science, I think it is time to close this thread.

    The whole thing is a waste of time, anyway.
     
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