Are you an introvert or extrovert?

Discussion in 'Human Science' started by wegs, Jun 7, 2019.

  1. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    It will literally murder an introvert.
     
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  3. Jeeves Valued Senior Member

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    Cos we're a TEAM! I get it. Go, TEAM!
     
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  5. wegs Matter & Pixie Dust Valued Senior Member

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    Exactly. It could even slightly injure an extrovert.

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    There's no way. Just no way. Mainly for germ reasons, tbh. lol

    I'm hard to please.

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    ETA: Sharing cubes and computers shows a lack of investment in a company’s employees, imo. Oh, but lemme guess, the CEO has a corner office with a view and landing pad for his jet?
     
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2019
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  7. Seattle Valued Senior Member

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    Instead of a open floor plan office at one extreme or fancy offices that get fancier depending on your pay grade/job title at the other extreme, I think the best compromise is where everyone has some basic privacy and there there is little difference depending on your job title.

    In other words the president/owner has a basic desk/office/cubicle just like everyone else.
     
  8. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    Heh. It's not inadvertent. These are deliberate attempts (whether successful or not) to encourage certain types of interaction.

    Shared cubicles are usually used where emps have roles that require constant interaction.

    Pair Programming is a technique for writing better code based on the adage 'two heads are better than one'. (again, no comment on whether it works or not). It's sure not for me. In fact it's a deal breaker.
     
  9. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    Yep. At one place, the CEO had the whole office re-designed into one room. He sat at a desk, like everyone else. Behind him was an office where he could go to make private phone calls.

    At another place, the CEO would have a regimen of sitting at some random desk in some random department several days a week, so that he is seen to be both accessible and in-touch.

    These are people that were serious about their company being happy, transparent, accessible and maintaining high morale.
     
  10. iceaura Valued Senior Member

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    And you don't chew with your mouth open, you don't have audible conversations with anyone near the desks of people who are trying to concentrate, you don't walk around or stand behind them while they are working, , your headphones are dialed down so they can't be heard at the next desk, and so forth.

    Meanwhile, people with data keep coming up with the same conclusions - people are more apt to collaborate when they haven't been battling interruptions and distractions all day long, they think better when they can concentrate without interruption or distraction, and they are much more sensitive to noise than they admit.
     
  11. Jeeves Valued Senior Member

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    How big is a viable team? What is its composition?
    I'm not referring to any studies right now; just recalling various work situations.
    With one other person - not some random person assigned to work with me but someone with whom I have a rapport - I can collaborate closely for a few hours at a time. Then we have to go away to our private space, reflect, calculate, plan the next steps in private and return fresh to the task. We could as easily meet in either office.
    With two, three or four, we have to decide at the outset what the role of each one is to be (may need a team leader depending on the type of project), work independently, then bring our contribution to be compared and evaluated, then altered to fit with the others'. Ideally, at regular meetings in a dedicated room with a big table and a door.
    Any number over six or seven becomes unwieldy and unreliable, unless there is a very strong leader in charge - in which case, they can all stay put in their own favoured work-space while the team leader communicates with each member.
    Two people taking turns to speak and listen is communication. Three people talking at once is babble. Ten people talking at once is cacophony. Two people trying to talk to each other with twenty other pairs talking in the background is a hugely expensive misunderstanding waiting to happen.
    (and nobody's fooled by the egalitarian king walking among the peasants; they know who has the option of retreating to the palace at the first sign of plague)
     
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2019
  12. wegs Matter & Pixie Dust Valued Senior Member

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    Hmm. CEO’s who sit out on the same floor plan near their staff probably create more angst than they realize. Sure, it looks like they’re trying to be humble and such, but those types are probably micro managers.

    Companies who let their staff work from home (like mine) at least a few days per month, are progressive. All these companies who waste money on health food vending machines, playgrounds, and creative work spaces aren’t really listening to their employees. Many studies have shown that employees work best if they’re given flexibility to work remotely and/or have a space of their own at work. If I’m not mistaken, the open workspace failed at Google.

    Not to say there aren’t exceptions, but on average, most employees aren’t interested in working shoulder to shoulder with one another, while their CEO keeps an eye on them all day.

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    We’re adults. This isn’t kindergarten.
     
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2019
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  13. Jeeves Valued Senior Member

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    There's an interesting slant!
    What happened in kindergarten? Were the outgoing, confident children rewarded and reticent, withdrawn ones penalized all the way back then?
    Was it indicated to the "natural leader" that he* could achieve anything he wanted and made clear to a solitary, introspective four-year-old that she would never get her own way? Or his own work-space....
    .... unless they quit the ratrace and went freelance...
    (* a boy who organizes other children is 'a leader'; a girl who does the same is just 'bossy')
     
  14. RainbowSingularity Valued Senior Member

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    the new modern forward thinking business runs a flat floor. where ceos & directors sit among other managers and not far from the main group of workers.
    it makes accessibility and commonality of human concepts a simple easy environment.

    the days of the big flashy corporate offices are a dying breed and are economically in-congruent to forward thinking companys.
    there is a vast contrast.
    between the google play land office of computer programmers, and the functional work space of a large customer focused business.

    when you have the best people doing their jobs, they dont need fancy gold toilet seats
    the "having their own space" is a special mix of cubical size and placement.

    wall st opulence to show off greed and profit gouging doesnt sell well to socially minded high intellect high achievers who want to do the best they can in their role.

    thats my opinion

    some people want to see greed bleeding from the walls and a well established class system where fear is instilled in the lower class employees.
    those companys have no real place in the modern developing world.

    why would share holders want to pay $100,000.00 per year just for a corporate employees single office in some penile high rise.

    fake it till you make it...
    do you have to be a sociopath to fake it properly ?

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    Last edited: Jun 12, 2019
  15. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    Correct. In other words, I act like a responsible adult who is out in public and mindful of the people around him.

    And if there are others who do these things around me, then, just like anywhere else in public, I weigh the consequences of politely speaking up, or just being a little more tolerant.

    This is one of the things I mean by discouraging entrenchment. No employee should feel he a special right to privacy more than his job requires. It's not my TV den. It's not my fort. I'm here to work, not build a wall of shrubbery.
     
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  16. wegs Matter & Pixie Dust Valued Senior Member

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    If we could finger paint, or take naps on the floor like back during kindergarten days, then I'd be down for that at my office. Otherwise, let me have my own space, and don't micro manage me.

    Yep, often still the case. If a woman in business is assertive, etc she can be known as ''bitchy,'' whereas it's just another day in the office if a guy is assertive. #doublestandards
     
  17. wegs Matter & Pixie Dust Valued Senior Member

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    True, but it sounds like you have NO privacy. It's not a prison, it's a business office.
     
  18. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    What exactly do I/you need privacy for?

    If it's work-related, then my cow-orkers are remote enough for me to do what I need to do.
     
  19. wegs Matter & Pixie Dust Valued Senior Member

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    To post on SF?

    It’s the principle, for me. I don’t need to be in an ivory tower, just have a space of my own. In my job as aforementioned, I’m on the phone with clients and my boss doesn’t want clients hearing background noise.

    Okay.
     
  20. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    Yeah. I loaf around as much as is justified by how hard I work. That shouldn't be a problem for anyone.
     
  21. Jeeves Valued Senior Member

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    Thing is, that perception was instilled in the children from nursery school onward. Not just on the children who would eventually become bullies and victims, leaders and losers, but all the foot-soldiers in between. The competent and ambitious boys are trained up through the stages of effective leadership, while the equally competent and ambitious girls are constantly slapped down - or at least elbowed aside.
    So, the clever girls "fake it" - appear co-operative and deferential while learning to scheme and manipulate; the less talented but still ambitious grow big chips on their shoulders and often become bitchy*; the most subtle find a man who fits the leadership image and manage through him.
    The clever unambitious girls go into fields where leadership is of little or no importance.
    * This is a self-actualizing prophecy I've watched in action. People generally conform, to the best of their ability, to the role they're assigned. It's not always a comfortable fit.
    Depends on your work. In a number of jobs, it's helpful to have a wall to pin charts or maps of graphics on, for example; some people think best leaning against a wall with their feet elevated; some release tension with exercises or by throwing things at a wastebasket. Non cookie-cutter people have personal styles of working to their potential, and if they have no space to personalize, they have no opportunity to explore their potential. And, really quite a lot of people like to be able to scratch their heads while they think - in quiet, without headphones.
     
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  22. Jeeves Valued Senior Member

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    What do you suppose becomes of clever boys who don't fit any of the designated boxes?
    (hint: their friends are often clever girls)
     
  23. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    Got em. Lots of em.

    Doesn't require privacy, simply requires a general consensus that people work in different ways, and don;t tread on me.

    You are equating personalization with privacy. They are not the same thing. No one said you can't personalize your space*.

    It's mostly quiet. Headphones not often needed.

    If you need to be undisturbed, that's what rooms are for. Some rooms fit no more than one person, with a phone, a whiteboard and a chair & table for a laptop.

    What this promotes is the default state of engaging with your team and being aware, rather than a default state of being alone in your own world, only to come out when called.


    *Actually, TD Bank did say you can't personalize your space - because you don't have your own space. They have a Neighborhood Policy and a Clean Desk Policy. You must clear all items off your desk before leaving for the day. When you come in in the morning, you are free to take whatever desk is open. Rarely will you get the same seat twice in a row. That was a disaster.
     

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