Building Larger Supercollider: CERN Endorsed.

Discussion in 'General Science & Technology' started by paddoboy, Jun 22, 2020.

  1. paddoboy Valued Senior Member

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    https://phys.org/news/2020-06-cern-council-endorses-larger-supercollider.html

    CERN Council endorses building larger supercollider:

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    The CERN Council has unanimously endorsed the idea of building a newer, larger circular supercollider, dubbed the Future Circular Collider (FCC). The group made the announcement on June 19. The move is the first step toward building a 100 TeV 100-kilometer circumference collider around Geneva. As part of the vote, the group approved the launch of a technical and financial feasibility study for the new collider.

    Even as the team at CERN was reporting evidence of the Higgs boson, back in 2012, plans for a new, larger super collider were being proposed. Several ideas have been put forth, but they are now all moot except for the 100-kilometer plan—it calls for building the collider around the city of Geneva, intersecting the LHC at two points. The plan calls for first building a collider by 2040 that would smash electrons into their antimatter partners, called positrons, allowing for closer study of the Higgs and possibly dark matter. Initial estimates suggest it would cost approximately €21 billion.

    The approval by the CERN council was not an official go-ahead for the project—it was a go-ahead to look into its feasibility. The next step will involve figuring out where to dig the new tunnel and whether it will be possible to do so in the area near the LHC. If the feasibility study and financial estimates work out as hoped, the next step would be actual approval for the project to move forward. Once that happens, the funds for the project would have to be made available by participating countries in Europe and the U.K.—and this time, perhaps, from other countries such as the U.S., China or Japan. Also, research efforts would have to be developed and launched to design and build the hardware needed for the project.
    more at link..................


     
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  3. Write4U Valued Senior Member

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    Now, if we can adapt ultra-high speed photography to observe the collisions, so that later we can recreate the event, but slowed down to c = +4cm/s

    Wouldn't that be something? To witness the quantum collisions at an observable speed seems awesome to me.

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  5. Michael 345 New year. PRESENT is 70 years old Valued Senior Member

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    Scientists and their toys

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  7. paddoboy Valued Senior Member

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    Not sure how this proposal compares with the cancelled SSC, super conducting super collider in the USA, Texas I recall? Anyone remember that?
     
  8. sculptor Valued Senior Member

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    (wild guess)
    The odds of building the FCC for only €21 billion are somewhat comparable to a snowball's chance in hell?
     
  9. Yazata Valued Senior Member

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    Attempts are underway. Here's a team trying to make movies of quantum processes in atoms using extremely short pulses of extremely energetic x-rays produced with their x-ray laser. It can produce chains of pulses in the femtosecond range (10 to the -15 of a second). They are trying to push it into the attosecond range (thousandths of a femtosecond).

    They say, "The LCLS is about 10 billion times brighter than previous X-ray sources produced in the laboratory and also provides time resolution in the femtosecond range. In other words, LCLS is the first tool in human history capable of producing light with a wavelength on the scale of atomic length, field strength and time. For the first time we will be able to "see" quantum processes on the atomic scale. Our challenge is to make this happen."

    Kind of like a Salvador Dali painting or a Monty Python movie.

    https://ultrafast.stanford.edu/pulse-overview

    https://lcls.slac.stanford.edu/

    https://www6.slac.stanford.edu/news...-attosecond-electron-motions-x-ray-laser.aspx
     
    Last edited: Jul 5, 2020
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  10. Write4U Valued Senior Member

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    This bears showing'

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    A SLAC-led team has invented a method, called XLEAP, that generates powerful low-energy X-ray laser pulses that are only 280 attoseconds, or billionths of a billionth of a second, long and that can reveal for the first time the fastest motions of electrons that drive chemistry. This illustration shows how the scientists use a series of magnets to transform an electron bunch (blue shape at left) at SLAC’s Linac Coherent Light Source into a narrow current spike (blue shape at right), which then produces a very intense attosecond X-ray flash (yellow). (Greg Stewart/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory)
    https://www6.slac.stanford.edu/news...-attosecond-electron-motions-x-ray-laser.aspx

    Awesome!
     
  11. Michael 345 New year. PRESENT is 70 years old Valued Senior Member

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    Truely awesome

    But what have the Romans ever done for us?



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    Last edited: Jul 5, 2020
  12. Write4U Valued Senior Member

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    Cameriere.....three Spaghetti Classico.......please!
     
  13. paddoboy Valued Senior Member

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    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Superconducting_Super_Collider
    The Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) (also nicknamed the desertron[1]) was a particle accelerator complex under construction in the vicinity of Waxahachie, Texas.

    Its planned ring circumference was 87.1 kilometers (54.1 mi) with an energy of 20 TeV per proton and was set to be the world's largest and most energetic. The project's director was Roy Schwitters, a physicist at the University of Texas at Austin. Dr. Louis Ianniello served as its first Project Director for 15 months.[2] After 22.5 km (14 mi) of tunnel were bored and nearly two billion dollars were spent, the project was cancelled in 1993 due to budget problems.
    <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

    So the FCC is bigger. Good.
     
  14. Yazata Valued Senior Member

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    Actual photograph of a quantum process:

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  15. Write4U Valued Senior Member

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    Looks unfinished .......

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  16. Yazata Valued Senior Member

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    Like Schroedinger's Cat before you look in the box?
     
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  17. Write4U Valued Senior Member

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    Notice Don Quixote, far left edge? Plagiarism ?
     

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