How does a Virus become in the first place?

Discussion in 'Free Thoughts' started by river, May 17, 2020.

  1. river

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    Since a virus needs a host to replicate , such as us . Animals etc. It replaces the hosts Cells RNA with its own RNA .

    Then how does a virus , any virus , form in the first place ? Since it needs a Host to replicate . Is a virus formed within the bacterial its self ?

    What is the essence of the existence of " Virus " ?

    What is the " Virus " evolutionary tree ?

    What is the begining of a virus , what constitutes that primate biological virus form .
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2020
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  3. davewhite04 Valued Senior Member

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    In as far as COV19 goes it's mysterious, as are all viruses.

    Plagues is what they are calling COV19, but the facts checkout for the bubonic plague/black death, natural carrying flea, all natural. This COV19... strange. I read weeks ago that it had mutated 20 times, not sure how accurate that was but if it was anywhere near 20 it makes it ridiculous. Aliens, man couldn't make this up. It will all come to light.
     
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  5. river

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    So nobody can tell me the evolution of " Virus " .
     
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  7. davewhite04 Valued Senior Member

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    Get a book.
     
  8. river

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    Such as ....

    So there is a book on the evolution of " Virus " .
     
  9. davewhite04 Valued Senior Member

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    I presume so?
     
  10. davewhite04 Valued Senior Member

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  11. river

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  12. paddoboy Valued Senior Member

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    https://www.khanacademy.org/science/biology/biology-of-viruses/virus-biology/a/evolution-of-viruses

    Key points:
    • Viruses undergo evolution and natural selection, just like cell-based life, and most of them evolve rapidly.
    • When two viruses infect a cell at the same time, they may swap genetic material to make new, "mixed" viruses with unique properties. For example, flu strains can arise this way.
    • RNA viruses have high mutation rates that allow especially fast evolution. An example is the evolution of drug resistance in HIV.
    Introduction
    Have you ever wondered why a different strain of flu virus comes around every year? Or how HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, can become drug-resistant?
    The short answer to these questions is that viruses evolve. That is, the "gene pool" of a virus population can change over time. In some cases, the viruses in a population—such as all the flu viruses in a geographical region, or all the different HIV particles in a patient's body—may evolve by natural selection. Heritable traits that help a virus reproduce (such as high infectivity for influenza, or drug resistance for HIV) will tend to get more and more common in the virus population over time.
    Not only do viruses evolve, but they also tend to evolve faster than their hosts, such as humans. That makes virus evolution an important topic—not just for biologists who study viruses, but also for doctors, nurses, and public health workers, as well as anyone who might be exposed to a virus. (Hint: that means all of us!)
    Variation in viruses
    Natural selection can only happen when it has the right starting material: genetic variation. Genetic variation means there are some genetic (heritable) differences in a population. In viruses, variation comes from two main sources^11start superscript, 1, end superscript:
    • Recombination: viruses swap chunks of genetic material (DNA or RNA).
    • Random mutation: a change occurs in the DNA or RNA sequence of a virus.
    We can see variation and evolution of viruses all around us if we know where to look—for instance, in the new flu strains that appear each year.
    Mixing it up: Recombination
    Before we look specifically at the flu, let's examine how viruses swap DNA and RNA in a process called recombination.
    Recombination usually happens when two viruses have infected the same cell at the same time. Since both viruses are using the cell to crank out more virus particles, there will be lots of virus parts – including newly made genomes – floating around in the cell at once.




    more at link....
     
  13. river

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    Why do they do this

    And what has this got to do with the OP ? Nothing .
     
  14. paddoboy Valued Senior Member

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    https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/01/120126224526.htm
    Researchers at Michigan State University (MSU) have demonstrated how a new virus evolves, shedding light on how easy it can be for diseases to gain dangerous mutations. The findings appear in the current issue of the journal Science.

    The scientists showed for the first time how the virus called "Lambda" evolved to find a new way to attack host cells, an innovation that took four mutations to accomplish. This virus infects bacteria, in particular the common E. coli bacterium. Lambda isn't dangerous to humans, but this research demonstrated how viruses evolve complex and potentially deadly new traits, noted Justin Meyer, MSU graduate student, who co-authored the paper with Richard Lenski, MSU Hannah Distinguished Professor of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics.

    "We were surprised at first to see Lambda evolve this new function, this ability to attack and enter the cell through a new receptor--and it happened so fast," Meyer said. "But when we re-ran the evolution experiment, we saw the same thing happen over and over."

    This paper follows recent news that scientists in the United States and the Netherlands produced a deadly version of bird flu. Even though bird flu is a mere five mutations away from becoming transmissible between humans, it's highly unlikely the virus could naturally obtain all of the beneficial mutations at once. However, it might evolve sequentially, gaining benefits one-by-one, if conditions are favorable at each step, Meyer added.

    Through research conducted at BEACON, MSU's National Science Foundation Center for the Study of Evolution in Action, Meyer and his colleagues' ability to duplicate the results implied that adaptation by natural selection, or survival of the fittest, had an important role in the virus' evolution.
     
  15. river

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    The Virus was able to evolve because it kept understanding its environment . Until it got it right .

    The thing is though , since the virus evolves , it takes in information .
     
  16. river

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    Anyway , what gave rise to the form of " Virus " .
     
  17. paddoboy Valued Senior Member

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    Here's rather reputable defining of a virus.....

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK8439/
    Medical Microbiology. 4th edition

    General Concepts
    Genetic Change in Viruses

    Viruses are continuously changing as a result of genetic selection. They undergo subtle genetic changes through mutation and major genetic changes through recombination. Mutation occurs when an error is incorporated in the viral genome. Recombination occurs when coinfecting viruses exchange genetic information, creating a novel virus.

    The mutation rates of DNA viruses approximate those of eukaryotic cells, yielding in theory one mutant virus in several hundred to many thousand genome copies. RNA viruses have much higher mutation rates, perhaps one mutation per virus genome copy. Mutations can be deleterious, neutral, or occasionally favorable. Only mutations that do not interfere with essential virus functions can persist in a virus population.


    extract:
    Viruses are simple entities, lacking an energy-generating system and having very limited biosynthetic capabilities. The smallest viruses have only a few genes; the largest viruses have as many as 200. Genetically, however, viruses have many features in common with cells. Viruses are subject to mutations, the genomes of different viruses can recombine to form novel progeny, the expression of the viral genome can be regulated, and viral gene products can interact. By studying viruses, we can learn more about the mechanisms by which viruses and their host cells function.
     
  18. davewhite04 Valued Senior Member

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    And you'll have the title of resident virus expert after you read it.
     
  19. paddoboy Valued Senior Member

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    deleted
     
    Last edited: May 20, 2020
  20. Xelasnave.1947 Valued Senior Member

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    Ask God.
    Alex
     
  21. davewhite04 Valued Senior Member

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    river:

    If you ask me I believe there is intelligence behind every virus. Big Pharma, conveniently ease conditions these viruses cause. Aliens & Money, regardless of human suffering. This COV19 is different, it's lethal. 50% of people who go into intensive care with this die. It is the method used to usher in the Golden Age, this year. July 4th.
     
  22. Xelasnave.1947 Valued Senior Member

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    Starvation is not different..one million a year starve to death...why is it we ignore starvation and think the virus is a big problem?
    And given god is control what the f..k is his game?
    All part of the plan...and how many out there who will thank god for saving an aflicted relative...it's a miracle ... Where is god does he give a rat's?

    Fit free will into this crisis.

    All you god folk I ask how do you fit this into God's plan?

    And just watch the replies which will not come in...you river does this god fit your view of decent for humanity?

    How many deaths now? All sinners no doubt...the wages of sin is death..lots of folk have been paid and lots more left who see slashing their wrists as now a viable option...so tell me what is God's plan here...how can anyone believe?
    Alex
     
  23. Saint Valued Senior Member

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    Evolutionist should be able to answer this question,
    maybe virus comes from Ape, the ancestor of human beings.

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