Religion for modern astronomy

Discussion in 'Comparative Religion' started by mathman, May 14, 2022.

  1. Michael 345 New year. PRESENT is 72 years oldl Valued Senior Member

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    Got it

    Another my ideas are better than your experiments

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  3. James R Just this guy, you know? Staff Member

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    Who believes in "infallible science", exactly?

    The scientific method has as a core assumption that science is fallible.
     
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  5. LaurieAG Registered Senior Member

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    Incorrect.
     
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  7. LaurieAG Registered Senior Member

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    How about that thing that hasn't been found locally, is not made of anything that exists in science, and when it comes down to the finer detail of how it is 'found' the Virial CMB overdensity constant (Δc) is 100 while for a typical galaxy Δc is 200.
     
  8. Michael 345 New year. PRESENT is 72 years oldl Valued Senior Member

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    I have no idea what that thing is with blah blah blah characteristics

    Please specify

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  9. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    OK. We have some mysteries in an active area of research.
    How does that meet any of the conditions you listed?

    Perhaps more to the point: what would research and discovery be like if there were no mysteries and active areas of research that needed resolving?

    It's a process. It's called the Scientific Method, after all, not the Scientific Verdict.
     
    Last edited: May 23, 2022
  10. C C Consular Corps - "the backbone of diplomacy" Valued Senior Member

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    As far as a "theism-oriented" part of the public goes, any inclinations in that respect commenced being satisfied by UFO religions in the 20th-century. A list which includes pseudoscientific ideologies like scientology. (If only the Jacobin Club or the later Das Kapital had dabbled in space opera, how lovely to have their many intellectual descendants and contemporary political offshoots subsumed by that category.)

    The so-called "alien visitors" thereby become the new prophets, delivering augmented conceptions of God or gods. In some cases, the ETs may be regarded as deities themselves (especially if they have engineered themselves to a post-biology stage). Certainly, xenosophont archailects or "technological singularities spawned by extraterrestrial societies" would be classed as mitigated(?) supreme beings.

    With respect to astronomy, however, for some time its emotional justification or spiritual impetus has rested in: "When I have a terrible need of - shall I say the word - religion. Then I go out and paint the stars." --Van Gogh

    Many popular scientists are atheist, so why are they so happy to use the misty-eyed language of religion?
    https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2013/mar/01/science-science-policy

    "I'm an atheist," said maths professor Marcus du Sautoy when he took up the Charles Simonyi chair in the public understanding of science at Oxford. "But for me the important thing is the wonder of science." Advocates for science can't seem to give up on religion's selling points: the awe, transcendence, and worship.

    - - - - - -

    Why Care About Astronomy?
    https://www.universetoday.com/117512/why-care-about-astronomy/

    EXCERPTS: It’s true that astronomy has few practical applications and yet somehow its advances benefit millions of people across the world. ... Work itself [solving puzzles] is inherently valuable and it is somehow connected to our very existence. ... there’s mindfulness in the act of [astronomy] work itself.

    [...] Then there is the sheer joy of looking up. On the darkest of nights, far from the city lights, thousands of stars are sprinkled from horizon to horizon. We now know there are over one billion stars in our galaxy and over one billion galaxies in our universe. It fills me with such wonder and humility to know our small place in the vast cosmos above us.

    I firmly believe that astronomy has a spiritual dimension, maybe not in the sense of a supreme being, but in the sense of how it connects us with something bigger than ourselves. It brings us closer to nature by illuminating the ongoing mysteries in the universe.

    [...] We’ve glimpsed the wonders of the universe — both big and small — for others to appreciate. So while astronomy doesn’t set out with the intention of changing our lives on a practical level, it does change our lives. It has explained mysteries that have confounded us for thousands of years, but more crucially, it has opened up more mysteries than any of us can study in our lifetime.

    I have to wonder: what human being isn’t compelled to study a discipline that sparks such curiosity and joy?


    - - - - - -

    The Holy Cosmos: The New Religion of Space Exploration
    https://www.theatlantic.com/technol...the-new-religion-of-space-exploration/255136/

    EXCERPT: This idea of seeing space exploration as a religion has a long history, dating back to the Russians of the early twentieth century, many of whom self-identified as "Cosmists." From there it migrated to German rocket scientists like Werner von Braun, who took his ideas about space travel to America after the Second World War.

    Americans were slow to warm to space exploration. They saw it as a fantasy, but that changed as Americans began to regard technology with a new reverence in the postwar period. Today Americans are the most fervent Cosmists on the planet, even if manned space exploration seems to have stalled for the time being.

    _
     
  11. LaurieAG Registered Senior Member

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    LOL, you have something in common with those searching for dark matter.
     
  12. Michael 345 New year. PRESENT is 72 years oldl Valued Senior Member

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    If you assert so

    Is dark matter the substance you mean in your post

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    [P, post: 3698360, member: 194784"[:now and when it comes down to the finer detail of how it is 'found' the Virial CMB overdensity constant (Δc) is 100 while for a typical galaxy Δc is 200.[/QUOTE]


    .O sorry you say - hasn't been found locally - and preceded on to how and when it comes down to the finer detail of how it is 'found' the Virial CMB overdensity constant (Δc) is 100 while for a typical galaxy Δc is 200.

    An I to assume it HAS been found with a irial CMB overdensity constant (Δc) is 100?
    .

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    Last edited: May 24, 2022
  13. LaurieAG Registered Senior Member

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    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virial_mass#Virial_radius
     
  14. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    How does this support your assertions that
     
  15. LaurieAG Registered Senior Member

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    I was responding to Michael, Dave.

    Did you notice that 2 times Ωtot equals 2π Ωm as well as 2π 2π Ωb while Ωm equals 2π Ωb.

    While ID'ers can claim the ratio's are deliberate and some 'scientists' do claim it is coincidental (twice) no 'scientists' are actually looking to see if the ratio's are accidental.
     
  16. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    OK. so you toss out comments like 'science pretends to be infallible' and 'science is like a religion' and then you've got nothing to back it up.

    You're stuck in an echo chamber of your own bitterness.
     
  17. LaurieAG Registered Senior Member

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    This thread is called Religion for modern astronomy but it should be for cosmology.

    ID 101 exercise 1: Solve universally for tau (τ) without using dark things.

    2 x Ωtot = τ x Ωm = τ x τ x Ωb and Ωm = τ x Ωb

    Solution: τ = 2π

    Tau was used as a symbol for life or resurrection in the ancient Greek alphabet, was the equivalent of the last letter in the Phoenician and Old Hebrew alphabets, and which was originally cruciform in shape. Google also says that "Tau is the ratio of a circle's circumference to its diameter, and is first known to have been approximated by Archimedes. In the 18th century, mathematician Leonhard Euler popularized the Greek letter π to represent the ratio, defined as “half the circumference of a circle of radius 1."

    LOL.
     

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