What is inertia?

Discussion in 'Physics & Math' started by simond, May 6, 2002.

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  1. simond Registered Member

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    I know what it is, but how does it come about?

    ta
    Simon
     
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  3. James R Just this guy, you know? Staff Member

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    It seems to be associated with mass.

    We're not sure what causes mass yet. There was a theory concerning Higgs bosons, but they haven't been found yet, so it's still an open question.
     
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  5. Adam §Þ@ç€ MØnk€¥ Registered Senior Member

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    Welcome to here.
     
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  7. simond Registered Member

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    Hi James/adam

    Glad to have found this place

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    Yeah, I've heard of the higgs Boson - what energy levels is it expected to be found at?

    But can inertia be explained without knowing what causes mass?

    Inertia has bugged me for a while - looks like it's going to continue to

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    cheers
    Simon
     
  8. Merlijn curious cat Registered Senior Member

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    Hi and welcome simond,
    I have been thinking about that too. I fear I have too little knowledge of fundamental physics to come up with something constructive. The only thing I can think of is that inertia may be a property of space rather than of mass (in which case one may be able to explain inertia without knowing the cause of mass).
     
  9. simond Registered Member

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    Hi Merlijn

    I'm realising that I probalby don't know what inertia is at all, appart from the standard newtonian definition.

    looks like it pretty meaningless to ask the question if we don't know what mass is caused by.

    hay ho.

    regards
    Simon
     
  10. Merlijn curious cat Registered Senior Member

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    "I'm realising that I probalby don't know what inertia is at all, appart from the standard newtonian definition. "
    same here. but it is very interesting thing.
    so I appeal to all of those who have some more insight in fundaments of physics to contribute.
     
  11. (Q) Encephaloid Martini Valued Senior Member

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    Inertia is that quantity which is dependent upon mass, the more mass, the more inertia.

    But as James R puts it, we don't know what causes mass. Therefore it would be highly speculative for anyone to suggest they might know what causes inertia.

    But if one were to be speculative, we could say we might know these answers in our lifetime. Of course, I'm going out on a limb here.

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  12. Saith Registered Senior Member

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    How I understood it, mass is the result of the curvature of space (basically warped space). Isn't that how it is describe in general relativity?

    If I was to speculate where inertia came from then I would guess that it was the result of warped space trying to move thru unwarped space or the result of, as one website put it, the "interaction of an object with the background of all matter in the universe".

    I would imagine something like a magnet would probably have its own kind of inertia if a magnetic field had a huge range like gravity and was always an attractive force. The universe is really uniform so the force would be pulling all objects in all directions, making them hard to move in any direction.

    btw: incase anyone doesn't notice, this thread is a 3 years old
     
  13. Nisus by peace he shall destroy many Registered Senior Member

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    Inertia is the tendency of any state of affairs to persist in the absence of external influences. Specifically, in physics, it is the tendency of a body to maintain its state of uniform motion unless acted on by an external force. (This is called Newton's first law of motion, taken from Galileo's principle.)

    wikipedia omg...
     
  14. gnasher Registered Senior Member

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    Sir Issac Newton is mostly to blame.

    Things don't want to change. They are, like myself, and are pleased to keep themselves to themselves.

    Mass always has to be present. What will the energy interact with / effect otherwise? Obviously, with itself, but what measurable effect would it have? Forces have to be applied on something, or they can't be called a force. Similarly, when a particle take a chance and decides to become matter, it can sometimes expect its mates who are still energy to act on it, unless they are really exotic and don't interact with anything.

    'We're not sure what causes mass yet'? Many people are quite sure that it it is a specific state of order of quarks. A few ups, and a down or two. OK, make that a total of three.
     
  15. cato less hate, more science Registered Senior Member

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    some have suggested that it is an electromagnetic interaction.
     
  16. gnasher Registered Senior Member

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    Who suggested that Cato? What has EM got to do with inertia?
     
  17. dzerzhinsky Communist Registered Senior Member

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  18. Light Registered Senior Member

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    ?????? And just how do you intend for that article to explain your last statement??
     
  19. hybrid Registered Member

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    inertia is the internal motion of an object to stabilize its present state.

    the process of inertia as a motion is the appearance of mass in space in an instant in successive intervals.
     
  20. Spud Emperor solanaceous common tater Registered Senior Member

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    You fucking scientific trippers.
    It's so easy. It's the reluctance of a moving body to change direction.
    That's all.

    err,.. off the top of my head.
     
  21. neelakash Registered Senior Member

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    Inertia is one of the fundamental properties of matter/particle which is,by some strange token, is identical with the body's/particle's gravitational mass.
     
  22. Pandaemoni Valued Senior Member

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    There are two kinds of "mass" in a sense. Gravitational mass and inertial mass. So far as we know the two are equivalent, but without knowing more about where these masses come from, it's impossible to say that they might not someday be uncoupled in some way.

    Still I would not suggest that inertia is necessarily a property of mass as much of the time when we use the term "mass" we use it as a proxy to describe its inertia. I think inertial may be what we mean by "mass" in those contexts.
     
  23. Montec Registered Senior Member

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    Hello all
    Here is an "off the wall" (as in bouncing) simple model for inertia. Take two parallel reflective surfaces and reflect a beam of light off of one onto the other. The path of the beam (as it bounces/reflects) is inertia. The angle of the beam is speed. The intensity of the beam is mass. If you deform the mirrors then the path is changed.

    Hehe, just a wild idea.

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